J Biomed 2017; 2(1):8-11. doi:10.7150/jbm.17587

Short Research Communication

Mushroom Intake and Advanced Glycation End Products in the Skin among Community-Dwelling Elderly Subjects: Preliminary Data

Yaeko Kawaguchi1,2, Shinsuke Nirengi1, Kazuhiko Kotani1, Junichiro Somei3, Takuya Kawamoto2, Kokoro Tsuzaki1, Yoshikazu Yonei2, Naoki Sakane1✉

1. Division of Preventive Medicine, Clinical Research Institute, National Hospital Organization Kyoto Medical Center, Kyoto, Japan.
2. Anti-Aging Medical Research Center, Graduate School of Life and Medical Sciences Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan.
3. Clinical Research Center, Central Clinic, Kyoto, Japan.

Abstract

PURPOSE: Food intakes against advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which is involved in aging and related pathologies, remain explored. The current study was aimed to investigate the relationship between some food intakes and skin AGEs in a general elderly population.

METHODS: In 39 subjects (19 men/20 women, mean age 76.6 years), a questionnaire on intakes of foods, including mushrooms, was self-reported. Their AGEs were measured in the skin of upper arm by an AGE ReaderTM employing a method of autofluorescence (AF).

RESULTS: The mean skin AF value was 2.1 AU and the mean mushroom intake was 15.7 g per day. The mushroom intake was significantly and inversely correlated with skin AF (correlation coefficient = -0.42, P < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: The inverse correlation between the mushroom intake and skin AF in this population may imply the mushroom intake to be lowering AGEs. This is preliminary; thus, future research is warranted.

Keywords: glycation, mushroom, skin autofluorescence.

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How to cite this article:
Kawaguchi Y, Nirengi S, Kotani K, Somei J, Kawamoto T, Tsuzaki K, Yonei Y, Sakane N. Mushroom Intake and Advanced Glycation End Products in the Skin among Community-Dwelling Elderly Subjects: Preliminary Data. J Biomed 2017; 2(1):8-11. doi:10.7150/jbm.17587. Available from http://www.jbiomed.com/v02p0008.htm